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« Wrestler and Master (an Ancient Story) | Main | When the feeling is not there… the music is gone »

March 04, 2010

Comments

Ramon

Those who never learn from history are forever condemned to repeat it.

Robbie

http://gawker.com/5138017/the-creepy-corporate-cult-behind-last-nights-30-rock

Cheok

Here is the brand new program you are referring to: Affordable Quality (:-

Yasmin

"In reality, there was a risk all the way - because either technique created some waste in materials, manpower and processes."

You missed to highlight the most important risk in above sentence: Customer still will get some defective parts "With Confidence"

Black Belt

I am Black Belt and let me tell you GE Six Sigma is not just another quality program. The results prove it's success.

Chew D

10 most admired companies for quality:

http://money.cnn.com/galleries/2010/fortune/1002/gallery.mostadmired_product_quality.fortune/index.html

micro CEO

I've been involved in TQM, TPM, Six Sigma, and more...enjoyed learning from each one (for as long as it lasted).

The business of quality consulting reminds me a lot of the business of English conversations schools in Japan. Many pay in, not so many reach their ultimate goal. (This makes it a very profitable and sustainable business in both cases. :-)
Why don't more Japanese get their money's worth? On average, I would say they aren't truely intent on working hard enough to reap the benefits. As Isaac Asimov once said, "“Self-education is, I firmly believe, the only kind of education there is”...


I think quality programs are also akin to religions. Everyone believes his or hers is the best way to salvation or enlightenment. Most of the paths are positive and will point one in the right direction. In the end, key principles appear similar and it comes down to dedication to purpose and execution for excellence. This may sound jaded (maybe even arrogant?), but I do believe that any decent quality program (or any decent religion/philosophy) can work wonders if we stick to them with tenacity and perseverence.

Chen

When one takes the eyes off the ball (what matters most), and constantly looking for new things while not focusing on core, then need Programs of the Year to divert attention.

Takahashi

Interesting why question not asked to management who look for new program why current program not sufficient to deliver and what gaps? Easier to fix gaps by using some new tool or need noise about more programs...Starting new program require new structure and not be Lean way of doing. So create big inefficiency with restructure related and then many projects to show efficiency. Many time do not make sense

ExRabbleRouser

I always read “quality” issues with keen interests. They are the best argument for consulting job, management seminars, promotion opportunities, etc. The irony is simple; defect/waste is unavoidable and customer is only “confident” with risk of defect as long as he is NOT the unlucky one, in a 12 sigma program, getting hit by a meteoroid. Look at the 10 most admired quality companies (Chew): people got killed in the park; floating point errors; packages got damaged; flaming note book computers; toxic syndrome; products that killed and still killing people; returned dirty panties sold as new. Should I go on?

Setting fancy names aside; marketing gimmicks, cost cutting (corner), raising profits, etc., are just way of life in business (ultimate GBP). Often time, it is not the quality of product that is in question, it is Crisis Management that needs work. It is only human to feel invincible when you are in a roll. Tylenol scare, Processors recall, Lead laden Barbie dolls, and now Toyota are classic examples: “It can’t happen to my Company and our customers understand”. Right on Ramon; “those who never learn from history are forever condemned to repeat it”, particularly in Crisis Management. Looks like we need more consultants to teach Crisis Management than consultants to teach Quality as most top managers are clueless about Crisis Management.

Sam

To me quality discussion reminds me of discussions related to living healthy. We all know it is important,but only a few are really committed towards it. Thats why there are a number of marketing campaigns (aka diets and programs) which are designed to help the rest of us. However, due to a number of factors, most of us are not willing to work towards the goal in a long sustaining manner. I dont want to put the blame for the lack of success to the program as much to human behaviors and the external factors (fast pace life, lots of fast food stores etc).

Ramesh Tripathi

Reflecting on your previous Reflection
Game of Consultants September 24th, 2009
"Good consultants tell you (in other words, help you see) what you think you know, in a way that you understand (to take action and gain value).
Because if you really knew what you think you knew, then (hopefully) you would have done something about it."

http://fridayreflections.typepad.com/weblog/2009/09/many-people-call-a-doctor-when-all-they-want-is-an-audience-the-game-of-consultants.html

JR

ExRabblerouser has a point
You can’t guarantee a perfect product. Even if you think it is perfect, the customer may not agree. So, crisis management is critical in helping the company save face. In addition to this, expectations need to be aligned throughout the process and the messaging needs to align to the expectations.

In the case of Toyota, I’m convinced that they got hurt by consumer expectations being much higher for Toyota than for others. Then, when MGMT’s response was not aligned with high expectations, they lost the PR cycle. If their response had been more robust and better aligned to what we expected from Toyota, they would have not suffered so much pain. This was the crisis MGMT piece and they failed poorly on this just as Intel did with the initial floating point error response

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